New Single Unit

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New Single Unit

 
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Welcome to the N1 course for nutrition and program design
for trainability. Now you may not be familiar with this concept or this vocabulary word of trainability but that is going to be the biggest thing for the next, say 100 videos that you guys are gonna go through over this course. We're gonna spend an entire unit or two talking about just what trainability is and how it impacts our program design, nutrition design, and the decisions that we make. But if I had to sum it up understanding trainability gives you the power to chose the right work out program with the right nutrition program for a specific individual at a specific point in time because we all have individual needs. And those needs also change depending on what training we've come out of, the way we've been stressed, the things that we've been interacting with, our environment, how well we recovered from our previous training protocol. There's a lot of things that go into what does our body need right now? What can it adapt to and what can it recover from right now? And trainability basically goes through the concepts of understanding what can a person appropriately respond to? What can a person do performance wise? What can they handle nutrition wise? So that we can figure out what is the most optimal way to train and fuel them so that they're always making progress and getting some sort of result. A huge mistake or I should say a lack of information in the industry goes about how do we appropriately pick the correct program? There's no perfect program. Or the best program is the one that you're not doing. Well that can't necessarily be true 'cause you may by accident be doing the right program. There is a best. There has to be. Like by laws of probability there has to be something that would be the best for you in this particular moment. The question is are you willing to do the work to have the principles and the education and the knowledge and the application to figure out what that is? So over this course what we're going to do is we're gonna walk through an introduction of what is trainability and how do we program for that. In the following course we're gonna look at assessing an individual person but this particular course we're gonna get into how do cells function? How does our system function and respond to different types of training and different nutrition protocols so that we can understand what when we take pen to paper, when we write sets and reps what dies that actually mean for a person's body, both on a systemic and cellular level? When we have these concepts in line it gives us a tremendous amount of power because when you're looking at programing for somebody, one you have to figure out where's the most optimal place to start. And that's where we really have to assess the individual. But knowing what they need is one thing. But actually being able to give them what they need is the other. And that's what this course is all about is understanding what your program actually does. Understanding what your nutrition program and your program, do they actually line up together. Or do they not support each other. Because you can have a program for fat loss and you can have a diet for fat loss but they may not work well when you put them together. So you ave to chose of all the ways to lose body fat how will my going about that for this particular phase of training. What biochemical? What physiological things am I gonna take advantage of with a training stimulus in order to facilitate fat loss? Or to facilitate muscle growth? Or to produce increased strength and neurological efficiency or intensity? You have to figure out what is my strategy and what is an appropriate nutrition plan that both meets my needs from a physiological perspective and what the program needs in terms of fuel and the performance and the recovery from that. Do those live up? Because if I have certain nutritional limitations there simply gonna be training programs that just aren't gonna be efficient for me to do because either the performance won't be fueled or the recovery won't be fueled as optimally as it should. So those programs won't be very trainable because I won't be able to get fast results. I won't be able to get go results. I won't be able to do that program for very long because I won't be getting the performance and the recovery that I need. So understanding the trainability gives us the ability to match not just training and nutrition together but matching that to the individual needs at an individual moment in time. And as a coach, as an athlete, or just somebody that's trying to make improvements in their fitness, whatever the role is what's really empowering about this is that you always put yourself in the position to be making progress because you're always picking something where you can see improvement. And you're gonna know where that improvement should be. It should be measurable. You should be able to say, if I am training this stimulus. What's this type of nutritional support? I would expect this result from week in week out. And that makes it also extremely easy to measure when is this tapering off? When is it time to switch to a different training stimulus? To a different nutrition protocol? When is it appropriate to back off rather than just saying okay I am gonna cut back on volume that might be hey we can still keep the gas pedal down. We just need to change the gear that we're in. We need to use a different stimulus and we continue to work hard towards a goal but just differently. Whereas other people will just have to go from like oh we're trying to get results and then we're not. If you're doing any training stimulus and we're doing it at a level that's going to get results for a person it's not gonna be sustainable forever, right? It's route likely gonna be very short lived in terms of the benefit's. So understanding how to really laser, narrow down the training stimulus that you're getting so that you're getting a specific stress on that body but you're also avoiding other stresses gives you the ability through periodization and good program design to say hey I am gonna tap this button for a while and then as soon as that's no longer giving me the results I have all of these other tools. If I do the shotgun approach where it's like I am just gonna do stuff, I am gonna make a person work hard, I am gonna get output, what you're gonna end up with essentially is you're pushing all of these buttons and then when you stop seeing results there's very few options for you to go to. So sometimes the only option is to back off of everything. When we understand trainability we can through program design be very specific and through periodization take advantage of the things that aren't being taxed. We can look at okay at this particular moment what is this person now adaptable to. And it opens up this new realm for what I call potentiation from phase to phase to phase. So instead of thinking, alright I am just focusing on what the current goal is today or for this current phase, I can start thinking if I improve this person's cellular chemistry or their physiology by doing this training stimulus my following training stimulus they're actually gonna get better results. They're gonna be able to burn fat faster, build muscle faster, recover faster, and train more frequently, or whatever. I can start thinking ahead. I can plan on making a more resilient or increasing their performance over time by being able to periodize very specific stimulus's not just saying okay I am gonna ungulate between accumulation and intensification which are two extremely broad things. That's just like switching back and forth between one shotgun and another. We need to be more precise if we are going to take people and give them the best results at any given point in time and have them see continual progress. That progress may not be the same measures so I may not be scale for the entire time. It may not be body comp for the entire time. It may not be about able performance base for the entire time. But when you understand trainability you can understand where progress should be taking or taken during every phase that you do. So in this phase you're gonna make progress in X. But as we change that now we're gonna be looking to make progress in Y so at one point in time it'd be like hey we expect your body to go through this process where we're gonna see everything kind of re comp. We're gonna see your muscles fill up. We're gonna see a little bit of body comp going down. You weight might actually go up. And then our next phase, so maybe we're going into focusing more on depletions, like alright we're gonna expect to see your weight really drop down but you may feel like your muscles are not as full or whatever so being able to know exactly what you expect helps you both mentally and from an assessment perspective of is the program actually getting me the results that it should. Most people don't know because the programing is not specific enough. If the things that they're seeing should be happening or shouldn't. So they don't know how well is this working, right? It's this arbitrary, like well am I reaching towards my long term goal. Sometimes it's hard to tell, so we embrace the process or whatever thing that we do to validate sticking with that grind without knowing for sure that we're on the right path. When we understand trainability. When you understand how to put somebody in something that they're currently adaptable to, that they can recover from, that they can perform, that they can nutritionally support, you know okay this is where we're gonna see progress. This is exactly how we know the program is working for us or in some cases that it isn't. Maybe I made a mistake and then I don't have to spend six weeks or three weeks or whatever it may be in those programs that's not gonna yield a lot of results. I can make the changes very quickly and not lose any time or any progress.